Archive for the ‘IPv6’ Category

Happy Eyeballs

July 14, 2012

Geoff Huston wrote up a very interesting analysis of the RFC 6555 “Happy Eyeballs” features being added to web browsers recently.

As these features reach the mainstream stable browser releases and more people being using them Squid in the role of intercepting proxy are starting to face the same issues mentioned for CGN gateways. For all the same reasons. Whether or not you are operating an existing interception proxy or installing a new one this is one major new feature of the modern web which needs to be taken into account when provisioning the network and Squid socket/FD resources.

Squid operating as forward proxy do not face this issue as each browser only opens a limited number of connections to the proxy. Although Firefox implementation of the  “Happy Eyeballs” algorithm appears to have been instrumental in uncovering a certain major bug in Squids new connection handling recently.

A Squid Implementation

For those interested, Squid-3.2 does implement by default a variation of the “Happy Eyeballs” algorithm.

DNS lookups are performed in parallel now, as opposed to serial as they were in 3.1. As a result the maximum DNS lookup time is reduced from the sum of A and AAAA response times, to the maximum of both.

TCP connection attempts are still run in serial, but where older versions of Squid interspersed a DNS lookup with each set of TCP attempts the new 3.2 code identifies all the possible destinations first and tries each individual address until a working connection is found. Retries under the new version are also now limited per-address where in the older versions each retry meant a full DNS result set of addresses was re-tried.

As a result dns_timout is separated from connect_timeout which is now fully controlling only one individual TCP connection handshake.

Life of a Beta

July 11, 2009

From early inception when the developers have nothing but dreams for it.  Through the coding and arguments about what should be included and how. Through the alpha testing with its harrowing hours pondering obscure code from last decade. Even the odd period of panic as security bugs are whispered about behind closed doors. Such is the early life of software.

Two weeks ago word went out that 3.1 was reaching end-game.

This part of the release lifecycle seems to be going well. Packages appearing very slowly as QA throws demanding eyes on the code and making us actually fix things. Don’t be fooled by the packages out already, they have been in QA for a few months to get this far. On that note:

NetBSD, Gentoo, Ubuntu, FreeBSD and RedHat already have packages ready and available for at least testing use if you know where to look (ie the links right there might be a good start).

Debian has a bit more QA to go as of the writing, but the maintainer tells me there will be packages out soon.

OpenBSD and Mac turned out at the last minute to be running split-stack IPv6 implementations (for security apparently). All the documentation read in two years left the impression it was a Windows XP anarchism (and who runs XP Pro on a server?), so support was delayed and delayed.  The OpenBSD maintainer and someone interested from Mac are working with myself on closing that gap in the features.

There may be more OS with 3.1 packages. I’ve only begun working my way down the distrowatch.org popularity list to see which OS do and who to contact. Squid has bundles on over 600 OS apparently.

If you know who does the official packaging for your OS and whether there are 3.1 packages ready, please do me a favor and mention it. I’m seeking a web page where to find the squid (or squid3/squid30/squid31) package information and also the place where distro bug reports about Squid might end up.

Release 3.1

November 4, 2008

Kinkie pointed out Linus Torvalds blog today to the rest of us here working on Squid. As the release maintainer for Squid-3 this year I kind of agree, its a sad time to cutting a new version. For me its more of a reflection that for all the high hopes we have of this new release, we had the same or similar hopes of the earlier one. Just 12 months ago now.

On that sad note, yes its finally happened. 3.0 has aged into a full blown stable package. Most of a month and no new bugs. Perfect time for something shiny and new for the neo-tech fanclub. And so with that for an intro we are gone for 3.1 !

3.1 is available for beta testing in the form of 3.1.0.1. see the Release Notes for further details on the finer details of change.

This release has gained from the experiences of 3.0 and 2.6, starting from a much more stable base of code than the initial. 3.0 had a long period of years with few active developers, an interminably long period of testing releases, and in hindsight a premature birth.

Alongside the code this release has a wider collaboration with active users. For the first time in many years we held a Developer meeting that included Users. We who were there certainly took in a lot of feedback from all sides. I hope those users who talked to us can see in this release that their comments, even those made in passing, have been listened to and worked on.

The small comment from one user when asked what their biggest itch with squid was “we don’t like these being called STABLE, when its obvious they are not.” has led to the most notable change made to 3.1.  That comment and similar feelings by others lead us into discussions on the release naming and numbering. From which we have produced – 3.1.0.1 – the second milestone point of the branch we are calling 3.1. Where the developers have everything done and working for us.

no more DEVEL, PRE, or RC, no more premature labels guessing when things might be STABLE.  Just 3.1.0.1. Further testing from the rest of you will show whether anyone can consider it stable, unstable, usable or as buggy as raw earth.

From the developers; We use it. We love it. Try it, and see for yourselves.

Some of the stuff you will find there is;

  • a lot of small changes aimed towards easier use and configuration (three cheers to those who nagged long an hard for this).
  • a lot of network RFC compliance extensions, making 3.1 much more capable of meeting modern network needs. The future still holds improvements, but 3.1 is definitely better in many respects than everything that came before.
  • a lot of things to make Squid a better experience for your own users. More seamless network recovery tricks than ever before. We have even tagged along behind the international localization bandwagon in our own way to make the errors squid does have to show both pretty and readable.

Sadly, careful readers will notice a section of the Release Notes labeled “Regressions against 2.7”.  Yes, those of you who moved to 2.7 because you needed some brand new feature there may still have trouble migrating up to 3.1. What we have done is to port as many of the 2.6 features and fixes as we could. A few did not make it in time, but will be coming in 3.2, alongside the features added as experimental in 2.7.

On the overview:

  • 2.5 has disappeared over the horizon into the long dark night of obsoletion.
  • 2.6 is itself officially aging out now. Supported, but the developer first response is “can you try something newer?”.
  • 2.7 is being maintained for the few extremely high-performance accelerator setups. But in general the Squid-2 sequence is aging out for us developers.
  • 3.0 has reached a point of stability, though not fully-featured.
  • 3.1 is available for testing as the next step up. You should be planning to migrate up to 3.1 or later release.

If there are any features holding you to Squid-2, or even an issues you find with testing Squid-3 speak up, we rely on your input to choose the most needed features for porting.

Thank you all, and enjoy your use of Squid 3.1

IPv6 going mainstream in squid

December 17, 2007

Well folks, things are getting underway again just in time for the new year.

Starting with the Dec 16th daily snapshot of squid3-HEAD includes the long-awaited squid3-ipv6 branch of squid.

http://www.squid-cache.org/Versions/v3/HEAD/

To build the feature just add –enable-ipv6 to your configure options. There are other IPv6 settings for some setups, but most will not need them. Expect it to accept your existing 3.0 squid.conf while allowing you to tweak it slightly for IPv6 purposes if you have a v6/NG connection or desire to do so.

The new releases coupled with an IPv6 link as simple as a single-host tunnel add the ability to:

* source traffic from either IPv4 or IPv6 as needed or provided

* proxy web traffic between IPv4 and IPv6 seamlessly

* gateway an IPv4 or IPv6 -native network to the full transitioning web

* accelerate a website on both IPv4 and IPv6 Internets even if the web server itself is stuck without access to one protocol.

* measure network availbility over both IPv4 and IPv6 for peers and source selection

Some expected configuration problems and their solutions can be found in the Squid wiki FAQ

http://wiki.squid-cache.org/SquidFaq/ConfiguringSquid

Squid-2.6 IPv6

September 30, 2007

In case you didn’t know, there’s a work in progress for IPv6 support in Squid-2.6. You’ll find a patch here which, reportedly, is being used in production at a few sites.

If you’d like to see IPv6 in a future Squid-2 release – its a very large change to introduce in the squid-2.6 release so it would appear in a 2.7 or 2.8 release – then please join the squid-users mailing list and let us know.

(I hear a lot of people complaining about how Squid doesn’t “support IPv6” and yet won’t try Squid-3+IPv6 or even try googling for alternatives. The truth is that there’s been unofficial patches to Squid-2 to support IPv6 in some fashion for a number of years now – heck, there was an IPv6 patch to Squid-1! – but noone volunteered to stand up, tidy it up and get it in shape for inclusion into the main tree. If IPv6 is important to you then please say so; please test the stuff thats out there and don’t hesitate to donate to the Squid project with a note saying “for IPv6!”.)

WebDAV tester wanted.

August 4, 2007

One of the IPv6 squid testers has reported strange errors with a WebDAV enabled squid3-ipv6 build. Unfortunately he had no time available to track these down, and I don’t have WebDAV capability setup for use or testing.

I am seeking someone who does have the time and setup to test WebDAV in squid under an IPv6 setup. I am willing to act as a free consultant in the IPv6 side of the setup in exchange for this testing if needed.

Further Info on IPv6 – Where the official site actually is…

July 3, 2007

Since people seem to be redirected here in preference to the official pages on the squid IPv6 branch. I think its about time I made some quick references back there so all of you trying to use this wonderful branch can find the actual code and know how to do so.

The IPv6 work in squid is all currently documented at http://devel.squid-cache.org/squid3-ipv6/ and related pages. My contacts, or those of any developer is kept on to maintain it should be referenced from there.

How-To’s, configuration, patches, etc, etc, ‘all the guff’ as they say, will be available there shortly as well.

Beta testing begun.

June 25, 2007

A few days ago I posted the official announcement to the Squid-Dev mailing list and current list of known testers.  It’s time for it to be fully public and told here.

The code has reached a stable enough state that I am now using it full-time myself and have pushed it to Beta testing (pre-pre-PRE release) in the hopes that use by others might find it useful, prove its worthiness, or wrinkle out some more bugs (which, code being code I expect to happen).

Baring a few OS that have known problems:

* Win32 users are out in the cold due to MS choice of stack, even in Vista.

* Debian builds and runs, but does not playing nice to some tests. I’m beginning to think it is the test itself rather than the main squid code.

IPv6 sees daylight

June 8, 2007

Still early days in the testing, but squid3-ipv6 now seems to be over its teething segfaults (seems the cache-store was built of some old strange matter) and has been running for a few hours so well.

This post is the first fully browsed to, written and posted from IPv6 🙂

Like so:

::1 -> 2001:5c0:9388:0:217:9aff:febe:30e5(squid) -> 60.234.233.111 (squid) -> wordpress.com
Thank you to everyone who helped get it this far.

The alteration patch is so large, I am planning a daily tarball for the IPv6 code. But that is still a ways off.

For now those continuing with the testing will need to grab clean code from the June 9 daily snapshot and squid3-ipv6 patch when it gets built. Then do a full reconfigure on the binary and destructive rebuild of the testing cache-dir.

This is necessary since most of the segfaults have been traced to a few data store and transfer points causing corruption in transit.

I’m now open for feature-to-be-converted requests.

IPv4 shines through into IPv6

June 3, 2007

Squid3-ipv6 performed its full page load across the IPv4-IPv6 boundary two hours ago!

The goal is within sight, blinking orange icons and all.

It’s still operating with limits. There is a bug apparently in the ipcache that causes it to die a few minutes after starting. Also some unchanged socket logic means IPv4 clients are hamstrung and cannot access IPv6 servers yet. Same thing makes split-stack (win32) a long way off.

Still, even one page load is a large milestone for previously dead code. Google never looked so good.